5 Cancer Research Stories Worth Following – Spring 2017

Cancer research stories worth following this spring include a study on the benefits of immunotherapy for breast cancer patients.What’s the latest news in cancer research that we need to know about? In this post, I’ll briefly review several of the most interesting cancer research stories that have been in the news this spring.

These are a few of the recent stories that seem to have the greatest potential impact, at least from my perspective, and that I know I’ll want to follow as they develop further.

Topics covered this time include studies reported at the recent annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research on the use of PARP inhibitors to treat different types of cancer, as well as a study on the benefits of immunotherapy for triple negative breast cancer.

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5 Cancer Research Stories Worth Following – Winter 2017

 

Cancer research stories worth following for Winter 2017 include a possible use of an existing drug in triple negative breast cancer to prevent metastasis.What’s the latest news in cancer research that we need to know about? In this post, I’ll briefly review several of the most interesting cancer research stories that have been in the news this winter.

These are a few of the recent stories that seem to have the greatest potential impact, at least from my perspective, and that I know I’ll want to follow as they develop further.

Topics covered this time include a possible new use for an existing drug to prevent metastasis in triple negative breast cancer, and new imaging technology that could provide a noninvasive way to monitor ongoing treatment.

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5 Cancer Research Stories Worth Following – Spring 2016

Cancer research stories worth following this spring include a potential new treatment combination for HER2-positive breast cancer.What’s exciting in cancer research right now? In this post, I’ll review several of the most interesting cancer research stories that have been in the news this spring.

These are a few of the recent stories that seem to have the greatest potential impact, at least from my perspective, and that I know I’ll want to follow as they develop further.

Stories worth following include a potential new combination treatment for HER2-positive breast cancer, evidence from a large clinical trial of a gene assay that may help reduce unnecessary treatment, and a new study that offers some insights on male breast cancer. Continue reading

5 Cancer Research Stories Worth Following – Winter 2016

Recent cancer research stories worth following include a clinical trial of a new targeted treatment for triple negative breast cancer.What’s exciting in cancer research right now? In this post, I’ll review several of the most interesting cancer research stories that have been in the news this winter.

These are a few of the recent stories that seem to have the greatest potential impact, at least from my perspective, and that I know I’ll want to follow as they develop further.

Stories worth following include research on how the high cost of cancer treatment affects patients’ survival, an experimental targeted therapy for triple negative breast cancer and some striking preliminary trial results for a type of immune system therapy. Continue reading

San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2015: “These Data Belong to Our Patients”

The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium highlights the latest findings in breast cancer research such as efforts to develop more tailored treatments for patients.Attending the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium–as I did again this year–is an opportunity to hear directly from researchers about some of the latest findings in breast cancer research. It’s also a window into new directions that breast cancer research is going and what we may be hearing more about over the next few years.

There’s been a lot of hype lately about precision medicine. But in breast cancer at least, we really don’t yet have true precision medicine for most patients. But there are signs that’s starting to change. Continue reading

6 Cancer Research Stories Worth Following – Winter 2015

Cancer research news in early 2015 included first-time FDA approvals of drugs in several new categories.What’s exciting in cancer research right now? In this post, I’ll briefly review several notable cancer research stories that have come out over the last two to three months.

These are a few of the recent stories that seem to have the greatest potential impact, at least from my perspective, and that I know I’ll want to follow as they continue to unfold.

Some of the topics covered this time include targeted therapies, reducing treatment toxicities and triple negative breast cancer.

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The I-SPY 2 Breast Cancer Trial: How Clinical Trials May Be Changing

Three pill bottles spilling.It takes a very long time–thirteen years on average–for a new cancer drug to be developed, go through the standard clinical trials process and become available for patients.

Only a fraction of oncology drugs studied in clinical trials are successful. And the cost is extremely high at hundreds of millions of dollars to bring one new drug to patients. These facts, and the reasons behind this dysfunctional process, are discussed by Clifton Leaf in his book, “The Truth in Small Doses,” which I recently reviewed.

What can be done to bring better therapies to patients more quickly? One approach that is being tested is called “adaptive” clinical trial design.

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San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2013: What Did We Learn?

San Antonio skylineThe San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium provides an excellent opportunity to learn about the latest findings in breast cancer research–directly from the researchers. I had attended last year for the first time, and was excited to be able to go to the event again this year.

There were some very intriguing presentations this year about possible new therapeutic approaches that are either now in clinical trials or will be entering them soon. In that vein, I’ll describe two areas of longer-term research that received a significant amount of coverage. Also very noteworthy were two sets of findings that could lead to less toxic treatments for some patients, and one study that could eventually lead to a new prevention strategy for women who are at high risk for breast cancer. Continue reading