5 Cancer Research Stories Worth Following – Winter 2017

 

Cancer research stories worth following for Winter 2017 include a possible use of an existing drug in triple negative breast cancer to prevent metastasis.What’s the latest news in cancer research that we need to know about? In this post, I’ll briefly review several of the most interesting cancer research stories that have been in the news this winter.

These are a few of the recent stories that seem to have the greatest potential impact, at least from my perspective, and that I know I’ll want to follow as they develop further.

Topics covered this time include a possible new use for an existing drug to prevent metastasis in triple negative breast cancer, and new imaging technology that could provide a noninvasive way to monitor ongoing treatment.

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A New Year: Where Do We Go From Here?

A new year and improving health careOne of the things I enjoy about the holiday season is that it usually includes some down time to reflect a bit on the past year and opportunities the new year brings.

As we start this new year, I’m looking forward to (hopefully) a wonderful year ahead, but it’s hard not to also recognize that there are many uncertainties at play in the larger world today.

I’ve been thinking lately about some of the lessons I’ve learned going through difficult times in the past. One of those lessons was recognizing that even when our world seems to be veering off course, there are things we can control. And those are the small and large (mostly small) choices we make and actions we take every day that add up to the kind of year we have and the life we live.

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Cancer and Health Policy: Some Things I’m Watching

Issues to watch in cancer and health policyThe last month has been full of discussion about where we’re headed as a country following the November 2016 election.

Health care policy is a big part of that discussion. There’s been much opining on what the leadership in Congress will likely be seeking to do. Right now, we are mostly faced with a huge amount of uncertainty.

Discussions of health care issues are often presented in ideological terms. But here’s the thing about cancer: once you’ve had to deal with it, you’re perspective changes. Whether you identify with Republicans, Democrats–or neither–you realize that many of the things that matter most are the same for everyone.

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Cancer Clinical Trials: Why Don’t More of Us Participate?

Why don't more cancer patients participate in clinical trials?A recent study got me thinking again about one of the central issues around clinical trials — why don’t more of us participate?

Less than 5 percent of adult cancer patients overall participate in clinical trials, and the rate is even lower for patients from minority populations.

Some of the concerns that keep people from joining clinical trials arise from misperceptions about how clinical trials work. But often patients don’t know to ask about clinical trials and their doctors don’t mention them.

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Top Cancer Research Stories: Spring 2014

Laptop, newspaper and coffeeThis is the latest post in a bi-monthly series where we take a look at several of the most interesting cancer research stories that have come out over the previous two months. These are a few of the recent stories that seem to have the greatest potential impact, at least from my perspective, and that I know I’ll want to follow as they develop further.

Below are overviews of a number of the top cancer research stories that came out during March – April 2014. Also, in March, a study reported in the Journal of American Medical Association reviewed what is known about the benefits and harms of screening mammography from studies conducted over the past several decades–I’ve written about the take-home messages in a recent post. Continue reading

Top Cancer Research Stories: November-December 2013

Laptop, newspaper and cappuccino

This is the second post in a bi-monthly feature in which I’ll review several of the most interesting cancer research stories that have come out over the last two months. (If you missed the first post you can find it here.) These are a few of the stories that seem to have the greatest potential impact, at least from my perspective, and that I know I’ll want to follow as they develop further.

Here are my choices for the top cancer research stories for November-December 2013. To wrap up 2013, I’ve also included links to some good overall reviews of major cancer research news stories in 2013. Continue reading