5 Cancer Research Stories Worth Following – Spring 2018

A look at several "need-to-know" cancer research stories reported in Spring 2018.What’s the latest “need to know” news in cancer research? In this post, I’ll briefly review several of the most interesting cancer research stories that have been in the news this spring.

These are a few of the recent stories that seem to have the greatest potential impact, at least from my perspective, and that I know I’ll want to follow as they develop further.

Among the topics we cover this time are ways in which researchers are working to improve immunotherapy treatments so they can be effective for more people. Continue reading

Cancer Clinical Trials: Why Don’t More of Us Participate?

Why don't more cancer patients participate in clinical trials?A recent study got me thinking again about one of the central issues around clinical trials — why don’t more of us participate?

Less than 5 percent of adult cancer patients overall participate in clinical trials, and the rate is even lower for patients from minority populations.

Some of the concerns that keep people from joining clinical trials arise from misperceptions about how clinical trials work. But often patients don’t know to ask about clinical trials and their doctors don’t mention them.

Continue reading

San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2015: “These Data Belong to Our Patients”

The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium highlights the latest findings in breast cancer research such as efforts to develop more tailored treatments for patients.Attending the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium–as I did again this year–is an opportunity to hear directly from researchers about some of the latest findings in breast cancer research. It’s also a window into new directions that breast cancer research is going and what we may be hearing more about over the next few years.

There’s been a lot of hype lately about precision medicine. But in breast cancer at least, we really don’t yet have true precision medicine for most patients. But there are signs that’s starting to change. Continue reading