Cancer Treatment and COVID-19: What Are the Risks?

Cancer Treatment and COVID-19: What Are the Risks?As we come to the end of the long summer of 2020, we’ve now been dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic for roughly six months here in the United States. We still don’t know when it will end. Vaccines and treatments are under development, but when they will be available remains uncertain.

In the meantime, cancer isn’t going away. And delays in treatment that occurred early on may be part of the collateral damage from this pandemic. Continue reading

Breast Cancer: Are We Still Making Progress?

 

Are we still making progress against breast cancer?

One of my first posts here on After Twenty Years in 2013 was a look back at progress against breast cancer in the twenty years since I had been diagnosed.

Now, let’s take another look back, but this time we’ll focus on what we’ve seen in progress against breast cancer over the last five years or so. Continue reading

Making a Difference: Contributing to Cancer Charities

Making donations to cancer charitiesEvery two years, the American Cancer Society publishes a new report on breast cancer trends. The latest report came out earlier this month.

Does the report show we’re really making a great deal of progress against breast cancer as some of the media stories are presenting it? Or is progress more incremental in nature?

And how might we respond in a way that could make a difference–during this month of October and during the rest of the year as well?

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Blogging Challenge: My Answers to 10 Random Questions About Cancer

A summer blogging challengeIn this post, I’m taking up a summer blogging challenge posed by Nancy at Nancy’s Point to answer ten random questions about cancer that she has put together.

Nancy has shared her answers to the ten questions, and asked other bloggers and readers to join in and answer as many as they like.

So, here are my answers to Nancy’s ten random questions about cancer. Continue reading

Breast Cancer: How Much Progress Have We Made?

How much progress have we really made against breast cancer?It’s October, and Breast Cancer Awareness Month in now well underway. As always during October, we’re surrounded by pink products, business promotions displaying the pink ribbon and pink-themed advertising–all in the name of breast cancer “awareness”. But how much real awareness does all this bring? Does it actually help patients at all?

Why not take a step back from all the craziness for a moment and take a look at where we actually are in the fight against breast cancer. Breast Cancer Awareness Month has been around for 30 years. It seems fair to ask: with all this awareness, how much progress have we actually made against breast cancer? And if it’s not enough: how can we, or will we, do better? Continue reading

Breast Cancer “Standard of Care”: Standard for All?

Many women diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States are not receiving what is considered to be "standard of care."When we look at the progress that has been made against breast cancer over the last twenty years, an essential measure is mortality, how many lives are actually being saved.

The big picture story is that mortality from breast cancer for the U.S. population as a whole has declined somewhat, but not nearly as much as might have been expected given the emphasis on screening over the last twenty years.

But looking deeper reveals an even more disturbing story. Continue reading

Breast Cancer “Awareness”: What is the Message?

How can we get to a more informed level of breast cancer awareness--the kind that will result in needed action to end deaths from the disease?Each year during the month of October we are more than ever bombarded with the pink ribbon. But what really is the purpose of all this “awareness” today–beyond selling pink-ribboned products?

Breast cancer screening through mammography has now become widespread, but misperceptions about the disease are also widespread.

How do we get to a more informed level of awareness–the kind of awareness that may better lead to the steps that need to be taken today to end deaths from this disease?

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Breast Cancer: Where Are We After Twenty Years?

How far have we come in the fight against breast cancer?It was in the early 1990’s that I was diagnosed with breast cancer.

It also happened to be around that time that breast cancer advocacy and awareness efforts were starting to gain momentum.

We hear a lot these days about advances in the understanding of cancer biology, and about new experimental therapies.

But I sometimes find myself wondering just how much has been accomplished since the early ’90s. This post takes a look back at how far we’ve actually come in the fight against breast cancer in the past twenty years.

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Advocating for Innovative Approaches to Ending Breast Cancer

View of U.S. Capitol building on a spring dayLast Tuesday, May 8, was a beautiful spring day in Washington, DC. I spent the day with many other advocates on Capitol Hill visiting our representatives in Congress to ask for their support on two important initiatives in the fight against breast cancer. One initiative is 2015 funding for the innovative Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program. The other is a new initiative that would not involve any increase in research funding, but would leverage exiting resources and technologies to move us more quickly towards the ultimate goal of knowing how to end deaths from breast cancer.

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Recent Breast Cancer Screening Studies: What Are the Take-Home Messages?

Doctor examining a mammogram

Another major study on breast cancer screening was published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This study follows a report two months ago on the results of a large clinical trial on mammography conducted in Canada.

A summary of the Canadian trial’s main findings and links to several commentaries about it are in my recent post on top cancer research stories.

The study reported last week in JAMA did not include any new trial findings or other new evidence. Instead, it was a thorough review of what we know about the benefits and harms of mammography from the many trials and other studies that have been conducted over the last 50 years and an effort to distill from all this information what the current state of knowledge is about mammography. Continue reading